In News
[:en]
TO AFRICAN BIOSAFETY REGULATORS

22 August 2017

The Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA), a pan-African civil society platform championing food sovereignty in Africa, calls for an immediate ban on the importation into South Africa of Monsanto’s high-risk second-generation gene-silencing genetically modified (GM) maize destined for human consumption. AFSA rejects and condemns US corporation Monsanto’s plan to exploit millions of Africans as unwitting human guinea pigs for their latest genetic engineering experiment. AFSA also condemns the IITA field trial application in Nigeria using this same risky technology to produce GM cassava for the agro-fuels industry.

These GM applications target staple foods of maize and cassava, eaten by many millions of Africans every day. Scientists have reported that the untested gene-silencing effect is able to cross over into mammals and humans, and affect their genetic makeup with unknown potential negative consequences, and have called for long-term animal testing and stronger regulation before this goes ahead.

The latest move in the GM push into Africa

The Johannesburg-based African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) raised the alarm[1], warning that in July 2017 the South African government received an application from Monsanto for the commodity clearance (import for food, feed and processing) of a ‘multi-stacked variety’ of GM maize– MON87427 × MON89034 × MIR162 × MON87411. South Africa is not only the sole country on the continent to grow GM maize commercially but it also exports GM maize grain and products to various countries on the continent[2].

This would be the first time this second-generation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was allowed into Africa. Unlike standard first-generation GMOs, which inserted genes from other organisms, this GM maize variety uses the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway – also know as gene silencing. This aims to kill Western corn rootworm pests by interfering with (‘switching off’) their genes. The fact that South Africa does not have Western corn rootworm pests suggests that the real aim is not about pest control at all.

These second-generation GM crops are associated with new and unexplored biosafety risks. Biosafety testing of MON87411 has been woefully inadequate to date, and has relied on assumptions of safety, while ignoring the latest scientific understanding of the far-reaching effects of RNA (ribonucleic acid) interference, which is now thought to cross species barriers – and even kingdom barriers.[3] These risks must be addressed by proper risk assessment protocols and experiments, testing the effects on animal and human tissue, and long-term animal testing.[4] None of this has been carried out; risk assessment has only been done based on assumptions and computer models.

“We simply don’t know enough about RNA interference technology to determine whether GE crops developed with it are safe for people and the environment.  If this is an attempt to give crop biotechnology a more benign face, all it has really done is expose the inadequacies of the U.S. regulation of GE crops.  These approvals are riddled with holes and are extremely worrisome,” said Doug Gurian-Sherman, Ph.D., Center for Food Safety director of sustainable agriculture and senior scientist. [5]

Such GMOs are the latest in the GM push into the wider African continent. Nigeria has recently received an application for field trials of a GM cassava variety that uses RNAi to ‘switch off’ genes to reduce the amount of starch breakdown during storage.

It’s not just genes that get silenced. Scientists who dare to challenge the GMO establishment view are also ‘switched off’. Jonathan Lundgren is an award-wining entomologist who has published nearly 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals since starting at the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service. His recent research refuted the industry claim that the RNAi technology can target particular pests and leave everything else in the ecosystem alone, and concluded that it’s “largely unknown” how long the RNAi pesticide material would persist in the environment. Lundgren, who is currently not authorized to speak to the media, alleged this his work has “triggered an official campaign of harassment, hindrance, and retaliation” from his superiors. “He’s gone from golden boy to public enemy No. 1,” says Jeff Ruch, executive director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER).[6]

Africans should never be guinea pigs

The award winning Hollywood thriller ‘The Constant Gardener’ raised global awareness of the tendency of some unscrupulous global corporations to reduce drug launch costs and avoid regulatory constraints by testing new pharmaceuticals in developing countries. Interviewed in The Guardian in 2011, Ames Dhai, director of the Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa said: “Less stringent ethical review, anticipated under-reporting of side effects, and the lower risk of litigation make carrying out research in the developing world less demanding.”

Monsanto now seems to be copying from the Big Pharma playbook, using Africa as its cheap test laboratory. Nnimmo Bassey, the right livelihood award winning environmental activist, whose home country of Nigeria experienced high profile exploitative drug tests twenty years ago, said of the GM maize and cassava applications: “We are readying for the epic fights ahead against this dangerous, needless and untested technology. We shall never be guinea pigs!”

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are behind much of the GM research in Africa, and have pumped millions of dollars into the development of GM maize, GM cotton, and GM cassava. Despite this massive investment, the first generation of GMOs in Africa has yet to show any positive impact; indeed it has deepened inequalities. Yet this second generation technology is being pushed into Africa, bringing untold new risks to our peoples. The British newspaper, The Independent, implicated BMGF in a report on pharmaceutical companies allegedly carrying out clinical trials in developing countries without adequate informed consent of those being tested.[7]

Russian roulette with our lives

The President of Organics International, Andre Leu remarked, “RNAI is a completely untested technology that should not be released into the environment. It has the potential to disrupt all life on earth, including us.” He warns, “While the GMO proponents will argue that each RNAI fragment will only affect the genes that it is designed to target, the scientific evidence shows that it can effect multiple non target genes. This will result in unknown outcomes. They could cause diseases such as cancer if they activate oncogenes – or sterility by suppressing the genes for fertility and reproduction. They could affect viruses and bacteria to make them more dangerous.  This really is playing Russian Roulette with our lives.”

AFSA demands that while these risks remain, the introduction of this untested RNAi technology be unequivocally banned by all member states of the African Union. Regulators in South Africa and Nigeria are urged to reject the importation of this GM maize, and the field-testing of GM cassava. These grave threats to the health and well being of African peoples must be recognized, understood and resisted.

AFSA campaigns for food sovereignty – the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. We urge African policymakers to reject genetic engineering and support the transition to agroecology as the sustainable future of farming in Africa.

_________________________

[1] https://acbio.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/RNA-GMOs.pdf

[2] https://acbio.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Alert-%C2%AD-GM-Imports.pdf

[3] https://acbio.org.za/two-simplified-briefings-introducing-new-gm-technologies-and-biosafety-risks/

[4] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412013000494#!

[5] http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/press-releases/3594/poorly-tested-gene-silencing-technology-to-enter-food-supply-with-simplot-potato#

[6] http://www.motherjones.com/food/2015/12/usda-researcher-claims-harrassment-and-retaliation-pesticide-research/

[7] http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/without-consent-how-drugs-companies-exploit-indian-guinea-pigs-6261919.html

 

AFSA Members

  • African Biodiversity Network (ABN)
  • African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB)
  • Association Ouest Africaine pour le Développement de la Pêche Artisanale (ADEPA)
  • Coalition pour la Protection du Patrimoine Génétique Africaine (COPAGEN)
  • Comité Ouest Africain de Semences Paysannes (COASP)
  • Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Africa)
  • Eastern and Southern Africa Small Scale Farmers Forum (ESAFF)
  • Fahamu Africa
  • Farm-Saved Seeds Network (FASSNET)
  • Fédération Agroécologique du Bénin (FAEB)
  • Fellowship of Christian Councils and Churches in West Africa (FECCIWA)
  • Friends of the Earth Africa (FoEA)
  • Global Justice Now!
  • Groundswell West Africa (GWA)
  • Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF)
  • Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC)
  • Institut Panafricain pour la Citoyenneté, les Consommateurs et le Développement (CICODEV Africa)
  • Institut Africain pour le DéveloppementEconomique et Social (INADES-Formation)
  • JeunesVolontaires pour l’Environnement (JVE International)
  • John Wilson
  • La Via Campesina Africa (LVC Africa)
  • Network of Farmers’ and Agricultural Producers’ Organizations of West Africa (ROPPA)
  • Participatory Ecological Land Use Management (PELUM) Association
  • Plate-forme Régionale des Organisations Paysannesd’Afrique Centrale (PROPAC)
  • Réseau Africain pour le Droit à l’Alimentation (RAPDA –Togo)
  • Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA)
  • Tanzanian Alliance for Biodiversity (TABIO)
  • Thousand Currents formerly International Development Exchange (IDEX)
  • Union Africaine des Consommateurs (UAC)
  • World Neighbors


If you would like to add your organisation to the signature list of this open letter, please contact afsa@afsafrica.org, or add your endorsement in the comments below.

[emailpetition id=”1″]

 

 

 

 

 [:fr]

AUX RÉGULATEURS AFRICAINS DE LA BIOSÉCURITÉ

22 Août 2017

L’Alliance pour la Souveraineté Alimentaire en Afrique appelle à une interdiction immédiate de l’importation en Afrique du Sud du maïs génétiquement modifié (GM) de deuxième génération de Monsanto destiné à la consommation humaine. AFSA rejette et condamne le projet de la société américaine Monsanto visant à exploiter des millions d’Africains comme cobayes humains involontaires pour leur dernière expérience sur l’ingénierie génétique. AFSA condamne également la demande d’essai sur le terrain de l’IITA au Nigéria en utilisant cette même technologie à risque pour produire du manioc GM pour l’industrie des agro-carburants.

Ces applications GM ciblent les aliments de base, maïs et manioc, consommés par plusieurs millions d’Africains chaque jour. Les scientifiques ont signalé que l’effet de dépistage des gènes non testé est capable de se transmettre à des mammifères et des humains et affecter leur composition génétique avec des conséquences négatives potentielles inconnues et ont demandé des tests à long terme sur des animaux et une réglementation plus forte avant que cela ne se poursuive.

Le dernier mouvement dans le forçage du GM en Afrique

Le Centre Africain pour la Biodiversité (ACB) basé à Johannesburg a soulevé l’alarme[1], avertissant qu’en juillet 2017, le gouvernement sud-africain a reçu une demande de Monsanto pour l’autorisation d’importer (pour la nourriture, l’alimentation animale et le traitement) une «variété multi-empilée» de maïs GM- MON87427 × MON89034 × MIR162 × MON87411. L’Afrique du Sud n’est pas seulement le seul pays sur le continent à cultiver commercialement du maïs GM, mais il exporte également des céréales et des produits à base de maïs GM dans divers pays du continent[2].

Ce serait la première fois que cette deuxième génération d’organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) a été autorisée en Afrique. Contrairement aux OGM standard de première génération, qui ont inséré des gènes d’autres organismes, cette variété de maïs génétique utilise la voie d’interférence de l’ARN (ARNi) – également connu sous le nom de l’inhibition des gènes. Cela vise à tuer les nuisibles Western corn rootworm (diabrotica virgifera) en interférant avec («éteignant») leurs gènes. Le fait que l’Afrique du Sud n’a pas de ces parasites suggère que le véritable objectif n’est pas du tout le contrôle des nuisibles.

Ces cultures génétiquement modifiées de deuxième génération sont associées à des risques de biosécurité nouveaux et inexplorés. Les tests de prévention de la biosécurité de MON87411 ont été lamentablement insuffisants à ce jour et ont reposé sur des hypothèses de sécurité, tout en ignorant la dernière compréhension scientifique des effets de longue portée de l’interférence de l’ARN (acide ribonucléique), qui est maintenant censé traverser les barrières des espèces – et même barrières du royaume[3]. Ces risques doivent être abordés par des protocoles et des expériences d’évaluation des risques appropriés, en testant les effets sur les tissus animaux et humains et sur les tests à long terme chez les animaux[4]. Rien de tout cela n’a été effectué; L’évaluation des risques n’a été effectuée que sur la base d’hypothèses et de modèles informatiques.

«Nous ne savons pas assez sur la technologie de l’interférence de l’ARN pour déterminer si les cultures d’ingénierie génétique (IG) développées avec elle sont sécuritaires pour les personnes et l’environnement. S’il s’agit d’une tentative de donner à la biotechnologie des cultures un visage plus bénin, tout ce qu’elle a vraiment fait est d’exposer les insuffisances de la réglementation américaine des cultures de GE. Ces approbations sont criblées de trous et sont extrêmement inquiétantes “, a déclaré Doug Gurian-Sherman, Ph.D., directeur de l’agriculture durable au Centre de sécurité alimentaire[5].

Ces OGM sont les derniers de la poussée GM dans le continent africain élargi. Le Nigeria a récemment reçu une demande d’essais sur le terrain d’une variété de manioc GM qui utilise des ARNi pour désactiver les gènes afin de réduire la quantité de dégel d’amidon pendant le stockage.

Les scientifiques qui osent contester la vue de l’établissement OGM sont également «désactivés». Jonathan Lundgren est un entomologiste primé qui a publié près de 100 articles dans des revues évaluées par des pairs depuis le lancement du Service de recherche agricole du ministère de l’Agriculture des États-Unis. Sa recherche récente a réfuté l’affirmation de l’industrie selon laquelle la technologie ARNi peut cibler des ravageurs particuliers et laisser tout le reste dans l’écosystème seul et a conclu qu’il est «largement inconnu» de la durée pendant laquelle le matériau pesticide ARNi persistera dans l’environnement. Lundgren, qui n’est actuellement pas autorisé à parler aux médias, a affirmé que son travail “a déclenché une campagne officielle de harcèlement, d’entrave et de représailles” de ses supérieurs. “Il est passé du garçon d’or à l’ennemi public n° 1”, explique Jeff Ruch, directeur exécutif de Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER)[6].

Les Africains ne devraient jamais être des cobayes

Le thriller hollywoodien primé ‘The Constant Gardener’ a sensibilisé le public à la tendance de certaines sociétés mondiales sans scrupules à réduire les coûts de lancement de drogue et à éviter les contraintes réglementaires en testant de nouveaux produits pharmaceutiques dans les pays en développement. Interviewé dans The Guardian en 2011, Ames Dhai, directeur du Steve Biko Center for Bioethics de l’Université de Witwatersrand, en Afrique du Sud, a déclaré: ” Un examen éthique moins sévère, une sous-déclaration anticipée des effets secondaires et un risque moins élevé de litige, rendent la recherche dans le monde en développement moins exigeante.”

Monsanto semble être en train de copier du Playbook Big Pharma, en utilisant l’Afrique comme son laboratoire d’essai bon marché. Nnimmo Bassey, l’activiste environnemental primé, a déclaré des applications de maïs génétiquement modifié et de manioc: «Nous sommes prêts pour les combats épiques devant cette technologie dangereuse, inutile et non testée. Nous ne serons jamais des cobayes ! »

La Fondation Bill & Melinda Gates (BMGF) est derrière une grande partie de la recherche GM en Afrique et a injecté des millions de dollars dans le développement du maïs GM, du coton GM et du manioc GM. Malgré cet investissement massif, la première génération d’OGM en Afrique n’a pas encore montré d’impact positif; En effet, il a approfondi les inégalités. Pourtant, cette technologie de deuxième génération est poussée vers l’Afrique, entraînant de nouveaux risques incroyables pour nos peuples. Le journal britannique, The Independent, a impliqué la BMGF dans un rapport sur les sociétés pharmaceutiques qui aurait effectué des essais cliniques dans des pays en développement sans le consentement éclairé adéquat de ceux qui ont été testés.[7]

Roulette russe avec nos vies

Le président d’Organics International, André Leu, a déclaré: «L’ARNi est une technologie complètement non testée qui ne devrait pas être diffusée dans l’environnement. Il a le potentiel de perturber toute la vie sur terre, y compris nous. » Il prévient: « Alors que les promoteurs d’OGM soutiendront que chaque fragment d’ARNi n’aura d’incidence que sur les gènes visés, les preuves scientifiques montrent qu’il peut affecter de multiples gènes non cibles. Cela entraînera des résultats inconnus. Ils pourraient causer des maladies telles que le cancer si elles activent des oncogènes – ou une stérilité en supprimant les gènes pour la fertilité et la reproduction. Ils pourraient affecter les virus et les bactéries pour les rendre plus dangereux. C’est vraiment la Roulette Russe avec nos vies. ”

L’AFSA demande que, bien que ces risques subsistent, l’introduction de cette technologie ARNi non testée est clairement interdite par tous les Etats membres de l’Union africaine. Les régulateurs en Afrique du Sud et au Nigéria sont invités à rejeter l’importation de ce maïs GM et les essais sur le terrain du manioc GM. Ces graves menaces pour la santé et le bien-être des peuples africains doivent être reconnues, comprises et résistées.

L’AFSA plaide pour la souveraineté alimentaire – le droit des populations à des aliments sains et culturellement appropriés produits par des méthodes écologiquement rationnelles et durables et leur droit de définir leurs propres systèmes alimentaires et agricoles. Nous demandons aux décideurs africains de rejeter l’ingénierie génétique et de soutenir la transition vers l’agroécologie comme l’avenir durable de l’agriculture en Afrique.

 

[1] https://acbio.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/RNA-GMOs.pdf

[2] https://acbio.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Alert-%C2%AD-GM-Imports.pdf

[3] https://acbio.org.za/two-simplified-briefings-introducing-new-gm-technologies-and-biosafety-risks/

[4] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412013000494#

[5] http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/press-releases/3594/poorly-tested-gene-silencing-technology-to-enter-food-supply-with-simplot-potato#

[6] http://www.motherjones.com/food/2015/12/usda-researcher-claims-harrassment-and-retaliation-pesticide-research/

[7] http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/without-consent-how-drugs-companies-exploit-indian-guinea-pigs-6261919.html

 

L’Alliance pour la Souveraineté Alimentaire en Afrique est une large alliance d’acteurs de la société civile qui font partie de la lutte pour la souveraineté alimentaire et l’agroécologie en Afrique. Il s’agit notamment des organisations de producteurs d’aliments africains, des réseaux d’ONG, des organisations de populations autochtones, des organisations religieuses, des groupes de femmes et de jeunes et des mouvements de consommateurs. Ses membres représentent les petits agriculteurs, les pêcheurs, les éleveurs, les chasseurs / cueilleurs, les peuples autochtones, les institutions religieuses et les consommateurs en Afrique.

Organisations membres de l’AFSA

  • African Biodiversity Network (ABN)
  • African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB)
  • Association Ouest Africaine pour le Développement de la Pêche Artisanale (ADEPA)
  • Coalition pour la Protection du Patrimoine Génétique Africaine (COPAGEN)
  • Comité Ouest Africain de Semences Paysannes (COASP)
  • Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Africa)
  • Eastern and Southern Africa Small Scale Farmers Forum (ESAFF)
  • Fahamu Africa
  • Farm-Saved Seeds Network (FASSNET)
  • Fédération Agroécologique du Bénin (FAEB)
  • Fellowship of Christian Councils and Churches in West Africa (FECCIWA)
  • Friends of the Earth Africa (FoEA)
  • Global Justice Now!
  • Groundswell West Africa (GWA)
  • Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF)
  • Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC)
  • Institut Panafricain pour la Citoyenneté, les Consommateurs et le Développement (CICODEV Africa)
  • Institut Africain pour le DéveloppementEconomique et Social (INADES-Formation)
  • JeunesVolontaires pour l’Environnement (JVE International)
  • John Wilson
  • La Via Campesina Africa (LVC Africa)
  • Network of Farmers’ and Agricultural Producers’ Organizations of West Africa (ROPPA)
  • Participatory Ecological Land Use Management (PELUM) Association
  • Plate-forme Régionale des Organisations Paysannesd’Afrique Centrale (PROPAC)
  • Réseau Africain pour le Droit à l’Alimentation (RAPDA –Togo)
  • Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA)
  • Tanzanian Alliance for Biodiversity (TABIO)
  • Thousand Currents formerly International Development Exchange (IDEX)
  • Union Africaine des Consommateurs (UAC)
  • World Neighbors

Si vous souhaitez ajouter votre organisation à la liste de signature de cette lettre ouverte, veuillez contacter afsa@afsafrica.org

 

[:]

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

Start typing and press Enter to search